Dvorak Keyboard Input
#1
Apologies if this has been answered elsewhere.

I just want to ensure that I can change my keyboard input to Dvorak on the Pinebook Pro. This is fairly easy on most keyboards, but I wanted to make sure I could do it here before I purchase. It's an easy change on my System 76.

Just to clarify, I don't want to change the physical keys, just the input. I touch type, so I don't look at the keys anyway. They could be blank for all it matters to me.

Thanks for your help.
#2
(07-19-2020, 10:21 PM)GFreeman Wrote: Apologies if this has been answered elsewhere.

I just want to ensure that I can change my keyboard input to Dvorak on the Pinebook Pro. This is fairly easy on most keyboards, but I wanted to make sure I could do it here before I purchase. It's an easy change on my System 76.

Just to clarify, I don't want to change the physical keys, just the input. I touch type, so I don't look at the keys anyway. They could be blank for all it matters to me.

Thanks for your help.
Yeah, you should be able to just fine.  I'm not a desktop Linux expert, but I think it might depend on your Window Manager of choice.

But KDE shows support for Dvorak, Colemak, etc.  Not sure if keyboard setting options are universal.

Something to note in your future possible (expensive) computer gear acquisitions: custom keyboards that support per-key customization via flashing the board's hardware (e.g., QMK or ZSA's Oryx/Wally software).  Then you never have to worry about OS/WM software again.  Downside is that it seems that I'm never done tinkering with the layout; guess that's an upside in that I can add a layer for specific software and tweak my Dvorak base with forward slash (/) under my left pinky on Planck/grid layout keyboard.  QMK supports up to 32 layers and I'm using 20 for various ways of computer navigation including mouse and arrow controls on homerow with left/right mirroring (e.g., I hold H down and use AOEU for arrows and U down for HTNS arrows).

Just thought I'd mention another option.
#3
(07-20-2020, 07:45 PM)LittleWalter Wrote:
(07-19-2020, 10:21 PM)GFreeman Wrote: Apologies if this has been answered elsewhere.

I just want to ensure that I can change my keyboard input to Dvorak on the Pinebook Pro. This is fairly easy on most keyboards, but I wanted to make sure I could do it here before I purchase. It's an easy change on my System 76.

Just to clarify, I don't want to change the physical keys, just the input. I touch type, so I don't look at the keys anyway. They could be blank for all it matters to me.

Thanks for your help.
Yeah, you should be able to just fine.  I'm not a desktop Linux expert, but I think it might depend on your Window Manager of choice.

But KDE shows support for Dvorak, Colemak, etc.  Not sure if keyboard setting options are universal.

Something to note in your future possible (expensive) computer gear acquisitions: custom keyboards that support per-key customization via flashing the board's hardware (e.g., QMK or ZSA's Oryx/Wally software).  Then you never have to worry about OS/WM software again.  Downside is that it seems that I'm never done tinkering with the layout; guess that's an upside in that I can add a layer for specific software and tweak my Dvorak base with forward slash (/) under my left pinky on Planck/grid layout keyboard.  QMK supports up to 32 layers and I'm using 20 for various ways of computer navigation including mouse and arrow controls on homerow with left/right mirroring (e.g., I hold H down and use AOEU for arrows and U down for HTNS arrows).

Just thought I'd mention another option.
Hello,

Fantastic. Thank you so much for the reply and for the helpful suggestions. I really appreciate it.

Best,
#4
(07-20-2020, 08:11 PM)GFreeman Wrote:
(07-20-2020, 07:45 PM)LittleWalter Wrote:
(07-19-2020, 10:21 PM)GFreeman Wrote: Apologies if this has been answered elsewhere.

I just want to ensure that I can change my keyboard input to Dvorak on the Pinebook Pro. This is fairly easy on most keyboards, but I wanted to make sure I could do it here before I purchase. It's an easy change on my System 76.

Just to clarify, I don't want to change the physical keys, just the input. I touch type, so I don't look at the keys anyway. They could be blank for all it matters to me.

Thanks for your help.
Yeah, you should be able to just fine.  I'm not a desktop Linux expert, but I think it might depend on your Window Manager of choice.

But KDE shows support for Dvorak, Colemak, etc.  Not sure if keyboard setting options are universal.

Something to note in your future possible (expensive) computer gear acquisitions: custom keyboards that support per-key customization via flashing the board's hardware (e.g., QMK or ZSA's Oryx/Wally software).  Then you never have to worry about OS/WM software again.  Downside is that it seems that I'm never done tinkering with the layout; guess that's an upside in that I can add a layer for specific software and tweak my Dvorak base with forward slash (/) under my left pinky on Planck/grid layout keyboard.  QMK supports up to 32 layers and I'm using 20 for various ways of computer navigation including mouse and arrow controls on homerow with left/right mirroring (e.g., I hold H down and use AOEU for arrows and U down for HTNS arrows).

Just thought I'd mention another option.
Hello,

Fantastic. Thank you so much for the reply and for the helpful suggestions. I really appreciate it.

Best,

No problem. 

I gave up on laptop Dvorak and just use QWERTY most of the time as a means of keeping that layout in relative practice even though I learned Dvorak on a laptop.  Well, I'll consider changing it occasionally if I anticipate longer typing session and don't have a fancy external keyboard w/ me.  Sometimes I don't when I'm stubborn even at my hands' detriment.  QWERTY sucks but what can you do...
#5
I quit Dvorak about twenty years ago having to use too many computers that I couldn't alter. These days there aren't so many that I *have* to use, and those may be alterable. Now you've got me wondering if I should try to relearn it.
#6
For what it's worth, I love Dvorak. It didn't take long to memorize. If you touch type, it's very much worth the effort to learn. I'm easily twice as fast and have likely saved myself some serious hand injuries using it. I type fairly continuously most of the day and I couldn't survive without it.
#7
It doesn't take long to memorise*, but switching back-and-forth between that and QWERTY is worse than going from acoustic dobro to standard electric.

*I was a lot younger when I learnt it and used it exclusively at home for years.

There was one thing I thought could be better about the layout but don't even recall what what was.
#8
(07-20-2020, 09:09 PM)KC9UDX Wrote: I quit Dvorak about twenty years ago having to use too many computers that I couldn't alter.  These days there aren't so many that I *have* to use, and those may be alterable.  Now you've got me wondering if I should try to relearn it.

I hear ya.  I stopped using the Dvorak layout mostly out of laziness and didn't feel like even thinking about keyboard layouts.  When I came back to Dvorak, it was mostly there.  I've been guessing that keyboard layouts lean toward subconscious vs. pure muscle memory, at least to some degree, in a person's mind.

As to whether or not it's worth experimenting with Dvorak, Workman, Colemak or whatever, it's really super personal.  It seems the closer something is to your body, the more personal of a decision it will be for you, in general.  Wrist watches/bracelets aren't for everyone, for example.

But if you are mainly an English speaker, write in English prose, I'd consider it.  If you write in multiple languages, use lots of different layouts, etc., I might not.  If you are a system administrator that deals with multiple computers, etc., I might not.  If you are a programmer, I'd consider it.  If you have hand/shoulder/forearm/etc. issues, I'd consider it for RSI reasons...but I would also consider split grid/ortholinear keyboards, too, in that case. (Plancks are nice for travel as they can be stuffed in a cheap Nintendo Switch or stethoscope case and don't take much space in a bag.)

The ergonomic benefits are mainly from effectively lower finger movement/travel.  The more typing you do, on the same layout, the shorter the overall travel.

If you don't type that much, I probably wouldn't bother adjusting to the stupid technological inertia that is the default QWERTY layout.


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