How to get started ? Share you development setup!
#11
I was thinking about hooking mine up to a Raspberry PIs GPIO pins, and compiling on my desktop, and doing the upload/download/monitoring over the network.

I have an unrelated question though. When these go into production will we still be able to hack on them like we are now? I would love to keep doing dev on my watch even if my design isn't where the community puts its weight behind
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#12
(11-03-2019, 09:56 AM)Hikari_Tadashi Wrote: I was thinking about hooking mine up to a Raspberry PIs GPIO pins, and compiling on my desktop, and doing the upload/download/monitoring over the network.

I have an unrelated question though. When these go into production will we still be able to hack on them like we are now? I would love to keep doing dev on my watch even if my design isn't where the community puts its weight behind

This depending on developer decision and assume still able to hack "wirelessly". However, if you hack a sealed PineTime and broke the update, this means you brick the device and becomes paper weight.
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#13
I found this one on Twitter : https://twitter.com/MisterTechBlog/statu...5342935040

[Image: EI754SiVAAInhhM?format=jpg&name=4096x4096]

PineTime in a box Smile
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#14
https://sites.google.com/brian-beattie.c...m/pinetime
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#15
I get a 404 error on that URL.
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#16
Here is my setup. ^_^
have verified everything, so will glue it together soon.[Image: a47d4f9a0e66d820072232a2f6728930.jpg][Image: 5198ce79d7b4cd78a5752b354f5f6d1e.jpg][Image: 4e751a18651d38c9d959fbe4098f3027.jpg][Image: 02b7b1baa0720bf718b33b60893a7c47.jpg][Image: 6ecbeb57b47d9be14446a2843d119f32.jpg][Image: 17a716a126792dccf2e2b540433eb1b8.jpg]

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk

Some assembly images[Image: 2c2668ead29110f2b1e5fdb34e0f07e8.jpg][Image: 2f13090eb8a9129ae2a65b8cadf48886.jpg][Image: ae35d4f004ecf2eca251e5fea356239e.jpg][Image: 289d4229e2baaf0144f7d702a86ecaab.jpg][Image: 8cd1a92e84b0bb75b83b3b969d37ce73.jpg][Image: 313bde235782cc8101cd6916eb462666.jpg]

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
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#17
Hi @ayke 

It seems I have pretty much bought the same solution to connect the PineTime as you have. J-Link EDU mini, SWD breakout board, ...

Would you mind to post which cabel from the PineTime debug connectors connects wich which connector on the SWDbreakout board. Most are clear, but I am missing where to connect the 3.3V power for example.

Also, which software/ commands did you use in this setup to access the PineTime?
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#18
(10-28-2019, 08:35 AM)ayke Wrote: Detail of the SWD pins:
[Image: IMG_20191028_145536.jpg]

The connection is:

Also, I have bent the antenna slightly to not be that close to the debug wires, to avoid shorts.
So that piece of copper is the BTLE antenna? I wondered what it was.
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#19
(03-19-2020, 11:30 AM)mcr314 Wrote: So that piece of copper is the BTLE antenna? I wondered what it was.

The open ended copper wire is BLE antenna.
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#20
I decided to test developing for the PineTime using Microsoft Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL).  This allows you to run Linux under Windows 10 without using a hypervisor or emulator like QEMU, VirtualBox or VMware, I ran my tests on a Microsoft Surface Pro 4.

Summary: Everything ran perfectly except for the most important part.  WSL could not access the STLink device to program the target device.  But there was a workaround.

The WSL feature is turned off by default so on Windows 10 you have to go into Settings - Apps - Programs and Features - Turn Windows Features On and Off. Click the checkbox for Windows Subsystem for Linux and OK.  After the restart I had WSL 1 installed.  Then you download and install the Linux version of your choice FROM THE MICROSOFT STORE.  I chose Debian ‘buster’.

Once Debian was installed I could open a special command prompt window and issue standard Linux commands. Linux graphics are not supported.

The Debian version supplied by Microsoft is quite lean.  A lot of the standard commands are not included.  In order to get an environment suitable for programming I had to use APT to install the following: git, make, unzip, bzip2, python, stlink-tools.  I also downloaded and installed the gcc-arm cross compiler and toolchain.

For testing I used a standard STLink V2 and an old STM32F103C8T6 ‘blue pill’ board I had available.  I downloaded FreeRTOS.  I built the standard ‘blink the LED’ program.  There were no problems building the bin file and performance was good. But then a serious problem appeared.

Debian could not see the STLink plugged into a USB port.  Windows could see it but Linux could not.  I found out that Linux under WSL can only access USB drives and similar devices but not other devices like the STLink.  A problem has been opened with Microsoft about this.

It is possible to get around this problem. Debian Linux provides a mount point /MNT/C which points to the Windows C: drive.  I copied the bin file created by the Linux build process to a Windows directory.  I then went into Windows and used the STM32 ST-LINK Utility from STMicroelectronics to program the bin file into the blue pill device.  Everything worked perfectly.

So, if you only have a Windows 10 system you can quite easily create a Linux environment to do developing for PineTime, with the only problem being you have to program the PineTime using Windows tools.
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