PINE64
How to handle a Pine64 correctly - Printable Version

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How to handle a Pine64 correctly - gbjensen - 04-13-2016

I think many of the Backers are not used to handle unprotected highly integrated electronic PCB's without encapsulation. 

There are several issues to consider, but first of all:

Electrostatic protection:
[attachment=99]
The board and component added to the PCB (Printed circuit Board) can be very sensitive to electrostatic discharges. 
Sources of electrostatic discharges can be YOU or the materials you use together with the Pine 64. 

If the Pine 64 is exposed to electrostatic discharges can the result be a defect Pine 64 - ether immediately or latent - waiting for a moment when it is absolutely not wanted or expected to fail. 

Protect it against electrostatic discharges. The board comes wrapped into a anti electrostatic bag and whenever you handle the board makes sure that you and where you place it have the same electrostatic potential as the Pine 64.

If possible, handle it at a protective work space away from chargeable materials like carpets, nylon, plastic bags etc. 
When you want to remove it from the bag, place it on a protective surface (e.g. on top of the anti static bag).
If you do not have an electrostatic save work desk (I do not suppose you have!) use a table made of non conductive materials ( e.g. wood or glass. Cardboard is also usable) but keep it away from electrostatic chargeable materials like nylon. Also think about what you wear. Prefer cotton, avoid synthetic materials.

Discharge your hand by touching the work area and the Pines anti static back. When removing it from the bas, grab it by one of the metallic connectors and the edges of the PCB. Avoid to touch the electronic circuits. (Both with and without power connected to the board.)

Make sure your pine and your other connected equipment have the same electrical potential. Use the ground / shield connections for this. If possible mount it into a conductive box (isolated from it naturally ) connect the GND or shield to the box. Thereby will you protect against electrostatic discharges but also limit the HF radiation from the Pine a bit.


RE: How to handle a Pine64 correctly - pine.tree - 04-18-2016

(04-13-2016, 12:42 PM)gbjensen Wrote: When you want to remove it from the bag, place it on a protective surface (e.g. on top of the anti static bag).

Overall good advice, but this quoted bit is incorrect. The anti-static (dissipative-type) bag has a conductive coating on it to "wick" away any shocks/static electricity from reaching the Pine64 inside. Placing the Pine64 on top of the bag would cause it to make contact with a conductive surface, and possibly short-circuit if powered on.


RE: How to handle a Pine64 correctly - gbjensen - 04-18-2016

(04-18-2016, 10:49 AM)pine.tree Wrote:
(04-13-2016, 12:42 PM)gbjensen Wrote: When you want to remove it from the bag, place it on a protective surface (e.g. on top of the anti static bag).

Overall good advice, but this quoted bit is incorrect. The anti-static (dissipative-type) bag has a conductive coating on it to "wick" away any shocks/static electricity from reaching the Pine64 inside. Placing the Pine64 on top of the bag would cause it to make contact with a conductive surface, and possibly short-circuit if powered on.

I have (after 30 years in the electronic business) never seen anti-static bag with an electrical conductive surface. You can try to see if you can measure a resistance with an Ohm-meter with the probes touching the surface very close to each other. So unless the Pine is packed in a Conductive bag and not an anti static bag should it be save to place the PCB on top of the bag and power it up.

Any way the best practice would be to build it into the wanted encapsulating first - but who can wait to do this?


RE: How to handle a Pine64 correctly - pine.tree - 04-18-2016

Video highlighting ESD bags- https://youtu.be/jQRIzgEVsjI?t=33s
General Static Shielding bags- http://www.uline.com/BL_56/No-Print-Static-Shielding-Bags-Open-End

According to the picture (found here: http://www.uline.com/images/copy/CI_51.gif), the darkish reflective layer is the conductive (but resistive) coating that is on the Pine64 bags. The point of the coating is to take outside static and absorb it until it "dissipates". I don't have a multimeter myself, but i would assume that some charge would still get through.


RE: How to handle a Pine64 correctly - blktiger - 12-12-2016

A fairly safe handling route would be to work on the pine (or any pcb - vid card, sound card etc.) next to your regular pc. Just touch a bare metal surface of your pc's case - like the back. This should ground you and remove any electrical static.
Case grounding is a basic hardware standard.


RE: How to handle a Pine64 correctly - MarkHaysHarris777 - 12-13-2016

(04-18-2016, 10:49 AM)pine.tree Wrote:
(04-13-2016, 12:42 PM)gbjensen Wrote: When you want to remove it from the bag, place it on a protective surface (e.g. on top of the anti static bag).

Overall good advice, but this quoted bit is incorrect. The anti-static (dissipative-type) bag has a conductive coating on it to "wick" away any shocks/static electricity from reaching the Pine64 inside. Placing the Pine64 on top of the bag would cause it to make contact with a conductive surface, and possibly short-circuit if powered on.

This is rediculous ^^ ^^

... the coating is highly resistive and is designed to bleed off excesive electrostatic charge slowly.  The bag will NOT short the board;  any more than a static mat on the technicians work-station will short the board.  Not a problem.

Failing to follow the advice on the previous post in proper handling of static sensitive boards IS a big problem;  words to the wise.


RE: How to handle a Pine64 correctly - InsideJob - 03-28-2019

I don't know what kind of bag your boards come in but I was told the same thing: don't lay boards on a shielded bag. A capacitor could still have a charge and the outside material sure looks like foil to me. I guess the pink translucent ones are OK (no shielding, just anti-static) but seems like as a general rule it'd be better to err on the side of caution.