Cardboard enclosure
#1
Hi, i am a new owner of a PINE64

I have already a RPi B and i found online a pdf to print (2d printer) on a plain cardboard. Then I cut it following the lines, fold it, a bit of scotch tape and made a 0$ enclosure.

I searched online but I didn't find anything similar for the Pine64 (since the communities are, for now, not comparable)

Someone of you has searched and found or made something similar?

Thank you very much
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#2
Your best bet for a cardboard enclosure for the Pine64 is to use the cardboard box it came in. Simply mark the general area where ports are located, and cut them out. The ports won't be flush with the outside of the cardboard, but the cables can help anchor the Pine64 inside the box.

There is a 3d printable file for an enclosure, i may be able to convert it to a flat "net" of the case. I'll post back here with a 2D cutout pattern when i get it done if you like.
If I've helped you with something, please leave a rating for my responses.
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#3
The nearly ideal box was already in my recycling bin. It had:
  • Correct width (but 6cm too long)
  • Thin cardboard
  • Viewing window
Thin cardboard is easier to cut precisely, and it allows the connectors to protrude a little. (The shipping box, with thick cardboard that is doubled-up on the ends, would have ports very recessed and harder to access.) Also, thin cardboard might also help with cooling, and make it easier to use the On/Off button.

A box that's long is fine, but too wide would be a problem. You can easily cut a long box down to size, as I did. The wrong width would allow the Pine64 to move around, perhaps, and make it harder to access the microSD card.

A viewing window is a nice luxury. It allows easy visibility of the LED. In a dark room, though, that red LED is bright enough to show, even inside a closed, cardboard box, assuming you've cut holes for ports. At least one of the holes you cut is going to be a little big, or slightly in the wrong place. At least, that was my experience.

Other considerations you may have:
  • Temperature / cooling
  • Protection from:
    • Static
    • Pressure
    • Spills & humidity
    • Dust
  • Space within the case for LCD, access to GPIO, Euler, battery, etc.
  • Access from GPIO to breadboard
(click to see full size)
    This case should meet my needs until I start using the GPIO. It protects from static, bumps, drops, spills and (somewhat) dust, while giving access & protection to the microSD, and access to all the cables.

I've detected no overheating, while using all the OS's mentioned in my signature, with the room temp as high as ~28C (82.4F). I've been able to play YouTube videos fine. Arcade-type video performance has not been good in Debian Linux. I'll test that again, the next time I use another OS.

    In hindsight, maybe cutting the hole for the On/Off button wasn't needed. Can't you just press through the cardboard? The hole helps my finger find the right spot to press, I guess.

By coincidence, the Pine64's headphone/microphone jack ended up right above the phrase "HD Audio" and in the center of the headphone logo. Cool

The box isn't perfect, but it only cost me time, it saved a box from the trash, and most importantly, the Pine64 is safer.

Hope this helps someone!  Smile
NexusDude of Central Texas
  • Setup: Pine64+ 2GB, On/Off button, RTC battery, 5V fan, LG 1.8A power adapter, Cat6 Ethernet, HDMI to TV, USB keyboard & mouse, SanDisk Ultra mSD "32GB" (28.7GB). Using Win32DiskImager.
  • Best OS experiences: Debian XFCE >> Android Lollipop > the rest
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#4
I agree with @Pine.tree and am just using the box that came with my Pine64. As of now, I am playing with it and so have not cut holes. It works fine even so although it is angled up slightly as the power connector rests against the side of the box. All that said, it also makes a handy storage container! :-)

My longer term goal is to buy one of the ABS cases when they are back in stock at the store, but there is no rush for me.
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#5
I've cut a hole in the touch screen box and mounted the screen on that with the Pine64 hiding beneath it.
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#6
(05-02-2016, 04:48 AM)Blindstealer Wrote: Hi, i am a new owner of a PINE64

I have already a RPi B and i found online a pdf to print (2d printer) on a plain cardboard. Then I cut it following the lines, fold it, a bit of scotch tape and made a 0$ enclosure.

I searched online but I didn't find anything similar for the Pine64 (since the communities are, for now, not comparable)

Someone of you has searched and found or made something similar?

Thank you very much

Hey man, take a look in this thread

http://forum.pine64.org/showthread.php?tid=1542
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