SSD for PBP
#21
(08-06-2019, 01:13 PM)zaius Wrote:
(08-06-2019, 06:35 AM)thequux Wrote: The Intel 660p seems to be that unicorn; cheap and 0.1W according to https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/...2-qlc.html . That power consumption seems shockingly low, so who knows how accurate it really is, but one would *think* that Intel knows how to measure it properly.

Thanks, it is only available in 2TB, 1TB, and 512GB.

Here is more information about the WD Blue SN500 which has a different edge-connector:

http://products.wdc.com/library/SpecShee...-00076.pdf

Here is more information about the WD Black SN750 NVMe SSD:

http://products.wdc.com/library/SpecShee...-00054.pdf

It looks like most manufacturers are using this https://bapco.com/products/mobilemark-2014/ or this https://bapco.com/products/mobilemark-2018/ which only runs on Windows.  If there is a similar testing application that runs under Linux on the PBP, that might help early SSD adopters share useful information.

Following this thread, and reviewing the datasheets with limited data (avg R/W in what Atemp, R/W load? ). My guesses we should have a "Best Bet" suggestions and all the early adopters run tests and/or extracts from Smart . 

Ill keep my eye on the price for Intel SSD 660p @ $36 USD for 128 and $54 USD for 256 not bad for a give it a shot hardware. 
https://www.amazon.com/Intel-760P-256GB-...BL3T9&th=1


-Happy Testing
(Posted from my Pinebook  PRO Mate)
Getting Paid to break your product (and make it better) since 2005
#22
According to Anandtech and Tom's Hardware, the Intel 660p consumes around 2.3 W average under load, so should be good.
Idle power (with ASPM) is 0.01 W which is very good.
Active idle power (without ASPM) is 0.67 W which is mediocre.
Wake-up time from idle is 55,000 µs which is pretty bad.

So how good it is depends on whether PCIe ASPM will work on the Pinebook Pro, I haven't seen anything on that yet.
If ASPM doesn't work yet or the wake-up latency is too high for your use case, then consider the Corsair MP510. (2.9 W load, 0.05 W idle, 0.43 W active idle, 1,900 µs wake-up latency).

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cor...848-2.html
https://www.anandtech.com/show/13438/the...d-review/8
#23
What about this one? https://www.kingston.com/us/ssd/a2000-nv...city=500GB
- .0032W Idle / .08W Avg / 1.7W (MAX) Read / 4.5W (MAX) Write
- up to 2,200/2,000MB/s
- 180,000/200,000 IOPS
#24
That brings to thought. Has any of the development guys done any thermal test/ load test on the PBP?

It might be a worth while endeavor, I would be happy thermocouple this puppy up with a NVMe SSD of choice and see what load tests stress the system to, so we all have some reference data to work from.
-Happy Testing
(Posted from my Pinebook  PRO Mate)
Getting Paid to break your product (and make it better) since 2005
#25
(08-06-2019, 02:57 PM)MrTester Wrote: Following this thread, and reviewing the datasheets with limited data (avg R/W in what Atemp, R/W load? ). My guesses we should have a "Best Bet" suggestions and all the early adopters run tests and/or extracts from Smart . 

Ill keep my eye on the price for Intel SSD 660p @ $36 USD for 128 and $54 USD for 256 not bad for a give it a shot hardware. 

I was thinking something similar.  In order to have better comparisons, the drives should be the same size.  I propose 256GB.  That is two times the size of the eMMC in this first batch, and four times the size of the eMMC in later batches.  256GB should be enough space for most purposes.  Also, smaller drives use less power than larger drives.  (Participants who need to carry around massive files could take advantage of USB Type-C and use a portable external drive such as the Samsung T5.)

I'm still looking to see if there is a Linux application similar to MobileMark.  If anyone knows, please post about it here.

Also, still waiting to get better physical specifications, such as maximum height.  I am not a mechanical engineer.  Although I'm thinking that the PBP doesn't have a fan and air is an insulator, so the SSD would use something such as a silicone pad to heatsink it.  Then again, I could be wrong about that.
#26
I have the 128GB version of the following, installed in my desktop:

https://www.microcenter.com/product/5050...ive-(512g)

The 512GB version is currently selling for $49 USD.

This is the Supported Power States shown with smartctl:

Supported Power States
St Op     Max   Active     Idle   RL RT WL WT  Ent_Lat  Ex_Lat
0 +     3.00W       -        -    0  0  0  0        0       0
1 +     2.00W       -        -    1  1  1  1        0       0
2 +     2.00W       -        -    2  2  2  2        0       0
3 -   0.1000W       -        -    3  3  3  3     1000    1000
4 -   0.0050W       -        -    4  4  4  4   400000   90000

No need to put a thermocouple on this one. nvme smart-log provides the sensor temperature of the drive.

EDIT: idling, this drive measured 38 deg C. Active (writing video), it measured 45 deg C.
#27
(08-07-2019, 10:19 AM)zaius Wrote:
(08-06-2019, 02:57 PM)MrTester Wrote: Following this thread, and reviewing the datasheets with limited data (avg R/W in what Atemp, R/W load? ). My guesses we should have a "Best Bet" suggestions and all the early adopters run tests and/or extracts from Smart . 

Ill keep my eye on the price for Intel SSD 660p @ $36 USD for 128 and $54 USD for 256 not bad for a give it a shot hardware. 

I was thinking something similar.  In order to have better comparisons, the drives should be the same size.  I propose 256GB.  That is two times the size of the eMMC in this first batch, and four times the size of the eMMC in later batches.  256GB should be enough space for most purposes.  Also, smaller drives use less power than larger drives.  (Participants who need to carry around massive files could take advantage of USB Type-C and use a portable external drive such as the Samsung T5.)

I'm still looking to see if there is a Linux application similar to MobileMark.  If anyone knows, please post about it here.

Also, still waiting to get better physical specifications, such as maximum height.  I am not a mechanical engineer.  Although I'm thinking that the PBP doesn't have a fan and air is an insulator, so the SSD would use something such as a silicone pad to heatsink it.  Then again, I could be wrong about that.

Not a mechanical engineer, but working along side of them when running their UL/ INSTU tests IRL, we would have to see the surface mating of the SSD to the case (if any) that may permit us to somewhat heat sink and aid in the performance of the drive. 

A silicone pad may help if there is any gaping. Ill see if I have some laying around, or can get some samples. I think I intentionally destroyed all the ones I had during recent tests.  Big Grin

I can easily get us some thermal imaging, and with stabilization during benchmarking also get us the max TC points of the drive and other critical compontry.

(08-07-2019, 10:28 AM)hmuller Wrote: I have the 128GB version of the following, installed in my desktop:

https://www.microcenter.com/product/5050...ive-(512g)

The 512GB version is currently selling for $49 USD.

This is the Supported Power States shown with smartctl:

Supported Power States
St Op     Max   Active     Idle   RL RT WL WT  Ent_Lat  Ex_Lat
0 +     3.00W       -        -    0  0  0  0        0       0
1 +     2.00W       -        -    1  1  1  1        0       0
2 +     2.00W       -        -    2  2  2  2        0       0
3 -   0.1000W       -        -    3  3  3  3     1000    1000
4 -   0.0050W       -        -    4  4  4  4   400000   90000

No need to put a thermocouple on this one. nvme smart-log provides the sensor temperature of the drive.

Good to know this is a value reported in nvme smart-log.
-Happy Testing
(Posted from my Pinebook  PRO Mate)
Getting Paid to break your product (and make it better) since 2005
#28
(07-27-2019, 03:43 PM)zaius Wrote: I just looked at a bunch of drives, and so far, most manufacturers don't include power consumption in the specifications Angry 

If anyone knows of a source of that information it would be greatly appreciated.  Considering how many people put them in portable devices that have limited power and battery life, I'm surprised that such information is not readily available.

The reviews at tomshardware.com include power usage under different scenarios.
#29
I suppose another thing is what can the board sustain transfer wise? no point in spending on a drive that transfers over that.
#30
(08-10-2019, 06:53 AM)Dreamwalker Wrote: I suppose another thing is what can the board sustain transfer wise?  no point in spending on a drive that transfers over that.

Somewhere around 1.5GB/s. I went into a bit more detail as to why over here, if you're curious.
Community administrator and sysadmin for PINE64
(Translation: If something breaks on the website, forum, or chat network, I'm a good person to yell at about it)



Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)