Don't use 5A !
#1
Exclamation 
I've been using the rockpro64 for first time today, with a power plug I bought separately 12V 5A. 

The first attempts to boot were a total failure with the keyboard leds blinking so something was going wrong for sure. 
Tried many SD cards until I got the board working. 
Surprise : the wifi module is not supported.... Confused  ok let's use a USB wifi dongle.

After some minutes my RockPro64 was simply disconnecting from the wifi, lagging in the console, and finally freezing.
In theory if you provide a higher Amp, the board should only drain what it needs... but then I tried a 2A power source I had around and all the problems were gone. The board was working as it was sopposed to do, with IPFS running for hours.

I've seen other posts about having problems with 5A.
So... keep your boards down to 3A. My suspicion is that 5A are only needed when you have LCD screen or other power consuming accessories connected.
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#2
(12-03-2018, 04:25 PM)vdo Wrote: I've been using the rockpro64 for first time today, with a power plug I bought separately 12V 5A. 

The first attempts to boot were a total failure with the keyboard leds blinking so something was going wrong for sure. 
Tried many SD cards until I got the board working. 
Surprise : the wifi module is not supported.... Confused  ok let's use a USB wifi dongle.

After some minutes my RockPro64 was simply disconnecting from the wifi, lagging in the console, and finally freezing.
In theory if you provide a higher Amp, the board should only drain what it needs... but then I tried a 2A power source I had around and all the problems were gone. The board was working as it was sopposed to do, with IPFS running for hours.

I've seen other posts about having problems with 5A.
So... keep your boards down to 3A. My suspicion is that 5A are only needed when you have LCD screen or other power consuming accessories connected.

Sounds like a bad powerbrick it has either not stable 12V at all or a bad barrel connector.

The theory is right and the bord uses only what it needs but some sources are unstable that can crash the board.
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#3
Well, that's quite common in switching power supplies, specially in the lower quality ones.
When you are in the very low range of their rated current, stability output issues could arise.
The best choice is having the load at 70/80% of the nominal current.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
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