Weather Station and IoT Kits?
#11
Undecided Unfortunately, this is less than ideal. If there are any issues for the readings to get there and they are re-sent, there will always be inconsistent on the actual timestamps, which compromises the data be used for simulations. This topology, unfortunately, won't be useful for us like that with the timestamps being added by the microcontroller.

You suggested the EEPROM, but the folks here didn't understand the usefulness of it since there will be no timestamp to be set together to the reading. What were your thoughts here?

Also, could you clarify if the other topology where the sensors are hooked to the I2C Multi POT would address the issue? How fast could we apply the timestamp and keep sampling? Would it be consistent? Unfortunately this way we would need to add microcontrollers all over the place due to the cable sizes, but it is still a better compromise than the timestamp and sampling rat eif that can't be addressed.
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#12
As I understand it, the wifi card with i2c is based on the ESP8266 chipset. I don't know how much these things are programmable or whether you've programmed them before, but you can get DS3231 real time clocks (i2c based) for under $5 from US vendors (and of course cheaper from China vendors). You could sync up the clock on a pine64, and move it over to the wifi (with the battery to keep the time running), and then the ESP8266 can poll the rtc to find out what time it is.

Alternatively, since the ESP8266 is wifi based, I imagine you could sync clocks via the internet such as with this Arduino example (http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-...me-Client/).

You could also plug in a gps, but I suspect either of the above methods of keeping time will be sufficient.
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#13
(03-15-2016, 09:36 PM)MichaelMeissner Wrote: As I understand it, the wifi card with i2c is based on the ESP8266 chipset.  I don't know how much these things are programmable or whether you've programmed them before, but you can get DS3231 real time clocks (i2c based) for under $5 from US vendors (and of course cheaper from China vendors).  You could sync up the clock on a pine64, and move it over to the wifi (with the battery to keep the time running), and then the ESP8266 can poll the rtc to find out what time it is.

Alternatively, since the ESP8266 is wifi based, I imagine you could sync clocks via the internet such as with this Arduino example (http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-...me-Client/).

You could also plug in a gps, but I suspect either of the above methods of keeping time will be sufficient.

Thanks! I guess this opens the question then if I can program the wifi module and connect this.  (editSmile it seems this can be done but I need to add in another piece for that:

[Image: PMPROG01_20USB_20Serial-1_large.jpg]

In this set-up (found it on the backkerkit photos for the wifi remote):

[Image: PMWF01A_20Wifi_20Remote_20IO-2_large.jpg]

So the suggestion is then to buy that part and given its I2C its guaranteed to work? Could you confirm? I would like to hear from khgoh if he there would be any issues too. Just to be clear: With this clock attached to it, then the intention would be to hook in this usb serial and make it add timestamps on top of logging the sensor readings? Therefore I wouldn't have the issues of loosing the timestamps? That would be great.. I imagine that if I could hook up the EEPROOM or something for it to log the data, then I could turn into a data logger such that I could have it storing the readings at a second resolution and making the server empty it out from time to time. But again, I am still a bit clueless on the EEPROOM. I need a bit more guidance here :-( 

I didn't follow on the connect to internet part, Ii thought the remote could only make itself visible to a pine and nothing else?
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#14
Regarding the EEProm, the reason I mention it is to use it as example for explaining that this topology do not require modification on the Wifi Remote I2c's firmware and server (which is not an easy task) if your application require to add in another I2c device. I did not mean that EEProm should be part of the solution. But if you want to develop your own firmware to include the EEProm using the Wifi Remote I2c as a stand alone data logger, you are welcome to do that.

Anyway, the default generic solution that we are going to provide will be according to the topology layout I mention previously. You still need to use the UART Programming Adapter to configure the SSID/Password/Server IP into the Wifi Remote I2c device before start using the device. When the Wifi Remote I2c device is power up, it will auto connect into your wifi network, after that connect to the server without user intervention.

At the same time, you can also use the UART Programming adapter to program/develop new firmware for the device. The hardware itself is open and you can write you own firmware for it. For detail programming API for ESP8266, you can refer to Espressive BBS at   http://bbs.espressif.com/viewtopic.php?f=67&t=823 . There is a lot development information on ESP8266 on http://bbs.espressif.com/
To setup the development environment under window, please check out http://www.esp8266.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=820  

As for the I2C port on the Wifi Remote I2c, any standard device (with 3.3V I/O) that according to the I2c standard should be able to communicate with the ESP8266.

The main reason of using this topology, is that user like your good self do not need to worry about the detail connectivity between the I2c sensor/device and your application. The server will manage all the TCP linkage with the multiple Wifi Remote I2c device. You application only need to open up 1 connection to the server (you can even direct telnet into the server using telnet function in putty to test out the system. It is fully text base communication between the server and your application), and through the server, your application will be able to manage all the Wifi Remote I2c device.

As for the timestamp on the sensor data, when your application request the data from the device eg. temperature,  your application only need to put the timestamp on the received data and keep the data together with the timestamp. Since the data packet is very small (typically 20 to 30bytes only), the tcp traffic from the Wifi Remote I2c to the server will be very fast (probably withing few hundred microsecond for slow network and is around 10ms if it is within you home private network).
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#15
Hello, can I attach two temperature-humidity sensors to a single WiFiRemoteI2C module? Would they get different addresses assigned on the bus?
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