Aclaratory notes about e-ink
#1
This video says the Pine Note has 60Hz refresh rate:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwMKfQtSXPE

Does it mean that the screen is continuously refreshing like a LCD/OLED smartphone? Isn't e-ink supposed to stay put forever unless it's changed? I say that because backlight PWM is bad for the eyes.

Also, would like to know how good is this screen compared to Amazon Kindle Paperwhite. I want the thing closes possible to a real book.
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#2
(09-05-2021, 01:55 PM)zxorg Wrote: This video says the Pine Note has 60Hz refresh rate:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwMKfQtSXPE

Does it mean that the screen is continuously refreshing like a LCD/OLED smartphone? Isn't e-ink supposed to stay put forever unless it's changed? I say that because backlight PWM is bad for the eyes.

Also, would like to know how good is this screen compared to Amazon Kindle Paperwhite. I want the thing closes possible to a real book.

As far as I know, it can make changes to the screen at 60Hz, but it needs multiple passes for a proper refresh.
But when the content is static, there will be no updates to the screen.
So the 60Hz is the maximum speed, but only when needed.
And don't expect to watch video in flawless 60Hz.

E-ink doesn't have a backlight, so it isn't using backlight tricks to lower the brightness.
The PineNote will have a frontlight, but that is not aimed at changing the brightness, but being able to read in the dark.

Good E-Reader says the PineNote is the Bigme B1 without colour.
One other major difference is that the BigMe B1 ships with Android and the PineNote will ship with Linux.
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#3
(09-05-2021, 02:35 PM)jiyong Wrote: Good E-Reader says the PineNote is the Bigme B1 without colour.
One other major difference is that the BigMe B1 ships with Android and the PineNote will ship with Linux.

The PineNote reuses the shell and other components, but the brains, i.e. the PCB with the SoC on it, are custom, and not a simple rebrand of an existing product.
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#4
Just surprised me that Pine decided to enter the e-ink readers segment with such a big screen and price point, instead of going for a 6-7" reader like the Kindle ones, just to read for causal users.

The most important things for such devices are not to have magnetic pen support, but have such a good e-ink and screen that's like reading a book. No idea how the PineNote will be, but that would be a really steep price for not being outstanding.
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#5
(09-05-2021, 11:57 PM)zxorg Wrote: Just surprised me that Pine decided to enter the e-ink readers segment with such a big screen and price point, instead of going for a 6-7" reader like the Kindle ones, just to read for causal users.

The Kindles are heavily subsidised through book sales by Amazon. PINE64 would not be able to make an eReader of a similar price point.

(09-05-2021, 11:57 PM)zxorg Wrote: The most important things for such devices are not to have magnetic pen support, but have such a good e-ink and screen that's like reading a book.

As somebody who owns and regularly uses a reMarkable, having good pen input is absolutely a selling point for a device. If you use your eInk devices mainly for reading books, then I see why you are not so much persuaded by the pen input. However, I for one appreciate no longer having random stacks of papers in my room getting larger with my scribbles.

(09-05-2021, 11:57 PM)zxorg Wrote: No idea how the PineNote will be, but that would be a really steep price for not being outstanding.

The used SoC is an incredibly good choice for moving eInk out of the realm of eReaders and into the realm of more general computing devices, as it is much higher performance than those used in eReader type devices.

As for your question about the screen, all eInk screens are made by precisely one company. In essence, if you have seen a 10.3 inch eInk display, you know exactly which one it uses.
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#6
(09-06-2021, 02:19 AM)CounterPillow Wrote: (snip)

(09-05-2021, 11:57 PM)zxorg Wrote: The most important things for such devices are not to have magnetic pen support, but have such a good e-ink and screen that's like reading a book.

As somebody who owns and regularly uses a reMarkable, having good pen input is absolutely a selling point for a device. If you use your eInk devices mainly for reading books, then I see why you are not so much persuaded by the pen input. However, I for one appreciate no longer having random stacks of papers in my room getting larger with my scribbles.

(snip)

I also want an e-reader for data sheet PDFs, notes, and checklists more than books, I have a thing to clip a tablet to the side of my laptop already.  If it is not expensive being able to highlight or edge note with a pen or maybe a touch would be nice.
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#7
(09-06-2021, 02:19 AM)CounterPillow Wrote: As for your question about the screen, all eInk screens are made by precisely one company. In essence, if you have seen a 10.3 inch eInk display, you know exactly which one it uses.

Sorry to jump on this one, but I am one of the backers of the Reinkstone R1 and that one uses Display Electronic Slurry (DES) and is a different technology than current screens.
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#8
Eink is a trademark, so...

But a slightly color screen would suit my uses perfectly.  I read and review academic papers.  I edit my own.

The slurry technology is one other company.  It becomes a choice between one and the other.  If choosing one means the device is not forcibly obsolete within other peoples' timelines, I can balance appropriately.

(Still looking for semi-full-sun educational epaper displays, but that's not this.)
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#9
(09-06-2021, 09:04 AM)jiyong Wrote:
(09-06-2021, 02:19 AM)CounterPillow Wrote: As for your question about the screen, all eInk screens are made by precisely one company. In essence, if you have seen a 10.3 inch eInk display, you know exactly which one it uses.

Sorry to jump on this one, but I am one of the backers of the Reinkstone R1 and that one uses Display Electronic Slurry (DES) and is a different technology than current screens.

The Reinkstone R1 is not yet on sell looks like.
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#10
(09-11-2021, 07:13 PM)zxorg Wrote:
(09-06-2021, 09:04 AM)jiyong Wrote:
(09-06-2021, 02:19 AM)CounterPillow Wrote: As for your question about the screen, all eInk screens are made by precisely one company. In essence, if you have seen a 10.3 inch eInk display, you know exactly which one it uses.

Sorry to jump on this one, but I am one of the backers of the Reinkstone R1 and that one uses Display Electronic Slurry (DES) and is a different technology than current screens.

The Reinkstone R1 is not yet on sell looks like.

The Kickstarter and IndieGoGo campaigns are over.
I think five review units were sent out.
Good Ereader and Make Use Of have done reviews.

https://www.makeuseof.com/reinkstone-r1-review/
https://goodereader.com/blog/reviews/han...per-e-note

So DES is real and recently TopJoy announced they plan to sell DES devices this year and there is a Kickstarter campaign.
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/top...n-e-reader
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