Lets create the PineCom
And probably provoke the ire of regulatory budgeteers... Smile
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(01-16-2021, 11:46 AM)Zack Wrote: I really wish this idea of a phone which can be used for decentralized and/or local communications will come to fruition.
Being able to call someone near you in a shopping mall, or in the neighborhood, as with a walkie talkie over wifi network would be great.

Yeah, Nextel had that until Sprint killed it, and AT&T bought out Nextel Mexico. I guess faster cell speeds (more instant messaging) and cheaper calls killed it off also.
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You can still use Nextel phones off-network, encrypted, and legally. I haven't done it in years, (no real need to), but I have a box of them for this in case for some reason I ever need them.
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The pinecom sounds like an intresting idea -- would it have a keyboard at all?

Or why not go down this route? Does anyone here remember an old thing called the Ben nanonote? Literally a tiny computer which really would fit in your pocket although it was short lived as a device. Haven't seen anything like this ever again alas ....

ljones
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You mean like a "pocket PC"? Those were quite common. I'd rather see something like the Handspring Treo (the original smartphone).
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(01-16-2021, 03:40 PM)KC9UDX Wrote: You can still use Nextel phones off-network, encrypted, and legally.  I haven't done it in years, (no real need to), but I have a box of them for this in case for some reason I ever need them.

That would be something interesting to do
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(01-17-2021, 10:48 PM)KNERD Wrote:
(01-16-2021, 03:40 PM)KC9UDX Wrote: You can still use Nextel phones off-network, encrypted, and legally.  I haven't done it in years, (no real need to), but I have a box of them for this in case for some reason I ever need them.

That would be something interesting to do

You might be able to find some for sale on the cheap to try it out.  Not all Nextel phones could do this; you need ones with the Direct Talk feature (also called Moto Talk IIRC).  The bad part is having to replace the battery.  I fully expect that all mine need new batteries by now.  They must have been in storage for well over a decade now.
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(01-17-2021, 11:17 PM)KC9UDX Wrote:
(01-17-2021, 10:48 PM)KNERD Wrote:
(01-16-2021, 03:40 PM)KC9UDX Wrote: You can still use Nextel phones off-network, encrypted, and legally.  I haven't done it in years, (no real need to), but I have a box of them for this in case for some reason I ever need them.

That would be something interesting to do

You might be able to find some for sale on the cheap to try it out.  Not all Nextel phones could do this; you need ones with the Direct Talk feature (also called Moto Talk IIRC).  The bad part is having to replace the battery.  I fully expect that all mine need new batteries by now.  They must have been in storage for well over a decade now.


A cursory search on eBay shows they are not so cheap. I do wonder what sort of range one could expect with them without having all the cell tower support. Those two way radios they sell now are quite cheap for up to 30 mile range compared to the Direct Talk cell phones.
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What gets 30 mile range? "Up to" is amazingly subjective. I don't know of anything the general public has access to that can seriously do 30 miles. But I do know that retail products make such wild claims. I have not seen "30" miles yet! Where I live, Direct Talk might do two miles (guessing). But nothing you can put in a pants pocket is going to do anything better without a repeater.

The thing about Direct Talk is that it's reasonably "secure". First it's digital, second it's in part of the spectrum that you can't legally use anything else to listen with in most places (meaning nobody anywhere makes receivers for it), third it's FHSS.

I personally don't worry about these kind of things. If I didn't have access to bigger and better stuff, MURS, FRS and CB would be for for me. But this isn't popular opinion. It seems that most people don't want to be listened to on the air. That's where Direct Talk comes in. It's "secure" but legal.
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Here is a Uniden claiming up to 50 miles.

https://uniden.com/products/two-way-radi...x507-2ckhs

I am sure you would have to be on hill tops with a clear view of each other to avoid curvature of the Earth on that range.

I wonder how secure Direct Talk is. There are certain brands/models of satellite phones which are encrypted, but allowed to be imported into India. The reason is the encryption on them has either been broken, or keys given to government. Otherwise any other of those phones are prohibited by law from being imported. So the Direct Talk may be worth purchasing
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